Eesti Ajaloomuuseum

  • Estonian History Museum

History

The story of the Estonian History Museum begins in 1802. The museum started from small private collections and acted as the Provincial Museum of the Estonian Literature Society. In the early twentieth century it became an important focal point in Tallinn's cultural life, hosting exhibitions and educational lectures. Major changes occurred after Estonia was incorporated into the Soviet Union in 1940. The museum was nationalized and reorganized as the History Museum of the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic. The museum moved to its current location, at the Great Guild Hall, in 1952. The History and Revolution Museum of the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic opened in 1987, in Maarjamäe Palace (outside Tallinn). In 1989, the museum was renamed the Estonian History Museum.

Archival and Other Holdings

The museum holds rich collections of archaeological and ethnographic items, textile pieces, art, coins, weapons, photos and documentary materials. An overview (in Estonian) of the museum’s collection is available online.

Finding Aids, Guides, and Publication

All fonds have finding aids, which are available to researchers in the museum. A short overview (in Estonian) of the museum’s collection of documentary materials is available online.

Opening Times

Maarjamäe Palace Pirita tee 56 10127 Tallinn. Office and collections open: Monday-Friday 9.00–17.00, Museum open: Wed-Sun 10.00–17.00.

Conditions of Access

The collections of the Estonian History Museum are open to the public. Researcher access to the stack room is usually granted, but requires permission of the head of collections and accompaniment by a collection manager or the head of collections. For information about using the collections, see: http://www.ajaloomuuseum.ee/en/using-the-collections

Accessibility

Information about traveling: http://www.ajaloomuuseum.ee/en/contact

Research Services

The Estonian History Museum does not have a special reading room for researchers. The museum’s collections, including documentary materials, are housed at Maarjamäe Palace (Pirita tee 56, Tallinn) and at Lai Street in the Tallinn Old Town. Collections are open weekdays 9.00–17.00. Please give advance notice of your visit.

Sources

  • YV/ClaimsCon'06/online search